Response Brief, Court Hearing, and New Years Day Brunch

We recently received the Response Brief from Dollar General/Dynamic Development.  
Our attorney is filing a rebuttal and we will post it as soon as we get a copy.
The Court Hearing is scheduled for January 17, 2014. (more on the location, time and room capacity soon!)
We are planning to hold a public meeting in Joshua Tree about 10 days before the court hearing.
We will post information about where and when that public meeting will be held just as soon as we have it all arranged.
In the meantime, if you have questions or comments please send us an email and we will respond as quickly as we can.

FYI – for just a  $100 donation through our GoFundMe Campaign, you can enjoy an exclusive New Year’s Day Brunch at Sacred Sands Bed & Breakfast!  
Only 8 chairs available and 4 are already claimed!

Thank You!

Below are links to the following files:

RJN ISO Opposition to Opening Brief.pdf

https://jtdba.files.wordpress.com/2013/12/rjn-iso-oppo-to-opening-brief.pdf

Opposition to Opening Brief (2).pdf

https://jtdba.files.wordpress.com/2013/12/opposition-to-opening-brief-2.pdf

Notice of Lodging AR Excerpts.pdf

https://jtdba.files.wordpress.com/2013/12/notice-of-lodging-ar-excerpts.pdf

 

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One Response to Response Brief, Court Hearing, and New Years Day Brunch

  1. D Strunk says:

    Copy of letter sent on 1/7/14 to JTDBA:

    I’ve been following this issue and have wanted to send you a donation in 2013. Unfortunately, work and the holidays delayed that for me. Please find enclosed $250 for the legal battle to defeat the Dollar Tree store in Joshua Tree.

    I am very upset by SB County’s interpretation of the Community Plan, and its efforts to reverse the intentions of local leaders in Joshua Tree. I was on the first committee that conducted the research, and drafted the bulk of the 2007 plan (with Jack Fuller, Melinda and others) before it was passed along to the final committee that the MAC assembled for its review and passage. I remember very clearly our detailed and lengthy discussions about the need to limit the commercial zoning, and promote small-scale businesses with small footprints. We developed a vision for a business district that clearly reflected the local desert culture, as well as Joshua Tree’s artistic and natural conservation aesthetics. We wanted to keep a business community that was accessible to start-ups and family operations, and encourage the business owners’ financial and personal commitments to the social concerns of our low-income residents, and to the national park. To accomplish that, we needed to appropriately scale the retail district, and serve only local residents, and the tourists engaging local hospitality. We wanted to discourage businesses with larger retail ambitions, which would disturb the competitive balance and promote a fast-paced, urban culture. It was clear that Joshua Tree was to be the antithesis of the corporate, strip mall blueprint that was emerging in Yucca Valley, and to a lesser extent, Twentynine Palms. At that time, the committee work was confirmed by the survey data we collected from over 100 JT residents/business owners, and the comments collected during the public review of the proposed plan.

    Also, the resulting language in the JT plan was not just a duplicate of another city’s plan, but the result of our reviewing over 30 different community plans of U.S. cities and towns that had a business character and culture similar to JT. Further, we initially drafted stricter retail and industrial definitions than the general plan committee would allow to be placed before the Board of Supervisors. So, the final plan was a compromise from what most people actually wanted. We had hoped to strengthen the restrictions and create special districts in the next plan.

    I may have relocated to the OC for marriage and family, but we are still homeowners in JT, and visit regularly. In retirement, I hope to resume a more active role in the community. However, if SB County opts to abandon the vision we’ve all embraced, I will move on to another community that espouses the values that I have, and that I think will prove to be the most economically, environmentally, and culturally sustainable in the long term.

    With warmest regards and support for the work you are doing,

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